Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.639154
Title: Barriers to data quality in the Wales Child Health system
Author: Talbot, M. A.
Awarding Body: University of Wales Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
This study explored health visitor record keeping and clinical information transfer for Child Health Reviews in four NHS Trusts in Wales. Communication was investigated in the relationships between what actually happened in real consultations, what the health visitor recorded and the subsequent selection and transformation of clinical information for coding and deposit in the central Child Health System (CHS) databases. Although the Child Health record constitutes the means for monitoring children’s health and development, little was known about how social relations affect information transfer, information content and data re-use in automated clinical systems. The aim of this study was to reveal how the processes identified affect information archived about Parental concern, Behaviour and Significant Condition. A Soft Systems Methodological approach (SSM) (Checkland 1999) was used to capture and interpret the purpose and meaning of clinical terms found in documentation for the delivery and evaluation of the Child Health Promotion Programme (CHPP). This study is presented in three phases: firstly finding out about record keeping and automated documentation in CHPP environments; secondly capturing the content of Child Health Reviews by means of audio taping; and thirdly exploring complexity in the clinical information pathway for one vulnerable child. Findings suggest that although health visitors carry responsibility for maintaining delivery of the CHPP, they are poorly equipped for timely access to electronic records supporting the CHPP; this hinders clinical ownership of the information and adversely affects data quality and partnerships with parents in record keeping. Culture and practice in the process of transforming clinical terms into representational data are shown to blind both the parents and the health professionals to unused potential in these electronic records.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.639154  DOI: Not available
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