Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.638414
Title: The influence of blood glucose on the cognitive functioning of young adults
Author: Parker, P. Y.
Awarding Body: University College of Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 1995
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Abstract:
A series of studies examined the impact of ingesting a glucose or a placebo drink on sustained attention on the Rapid Information Processing task, logical and abstract reasoning, recall of word lists, a Wechsler story, dichotic presentation of word lists, the Brown-Peterson task, the CANTAB working memory subtests and digit span. It was found the influence of glucose on cognitive performance depended on the demand and duration of the tasks, individual differences in the ability to regulate blood glucose levels and whether breakfast had been eaten. The negative effects of missing breakfast on memory could be reversed by the consumption of a glucose beverage in some situations but not others. The disassociation between the effects of breakfast and a glucose drink on cognition suggests that breakfast could modulate memory by several mechanisms, of which the increase in the provision of glucose is only one. The thesis for the first time demonstrated that individual differences in the ability to regulate blood glucose levels was related to cognitive performance in young, health adults. Good blood glucose regulation, as depicted by a fall in blood glucose levels during cognitive demand, was shown to be associated with better performance. In a dichotic listening task both a glucose drink and good blood glucose regulation was associated with a right ear advantage in word recall suggesting that glucose selectively facilitates active areas of the brain, in this case the left hemisphere. It was concluded that there is good reason to further study the possibility that the control of blood glucose levels, in the normal range, influences the cognitive functioning of young healthy adults.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.638414  DOI: Not available
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