Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.638352
Title: Carriage with compassion : an ethnographic study of a Welsh ambulance service
Author: O'Neill, M.
Awarding Body: University of Wales Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 2000
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Abstract:
The ambulance service through one of the most visible areas of health care provision is also one of the least researched. This study presents an analysis to how members of this particular group manage their occupational identity in the wider social milieu. By an examination of the cultural rules of the organisation and the implications of both history and occupational relations, this study provides a holistic examination of how such identity is managed and maintained on the various stages that ambulance workers perform their daily working activities. As will be explained in the study, during the past ten years there have been many developments in ambulance provision in the UK, a central one of which has been the organisation now not only provides transport for the sick and injured but also active medical care. One consequences of this changing role is a nascent "professional" occupational identity, which has to negotiate its position in relation to other "professional" groups. The main findings of the research were that the organisation was characterised by its large spatially spread out nature, which had implications for the development of multi organisational sub-cultures, which, in turn, had ramifications for occupational identity. In order for ambulance workers to manage such identity in the wider milieu they need to draw on occupational classifications that exist in society. The study also presents an analysis of the classificatory systems that staff utilise to address the contingencies of their working environment, which it is argued other studies in this field have failed to analyse sufficiently.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.638352  DOI: Not available
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