Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.637433
Title: Home detoxification treatment for alcohol dependence : gender role, social support and the change process
Author: John, B.
Awarding Body: University of Wales Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
The study is an investigation into the processes of change and the factors that facilitate the success of an alcohol treatment intervention. The sample of 91 participants is drawn from a randomised controlled trial involving home detoxification from alcohol with an added-on brief psychological intervention designed to enhance social support and coping strategies. Participants are categorised in terms of gender role orientation and also their pre-treatment levels of existing social support and their expectations of this support. The overall aim of the research is to explore the relationships between these interpersonal and intra-personal factors, and the impact that these have on individual change in the post-treatment period. Assessment measures include alcohol consumption, abstinence, alcohol related problems, self-esteem, social support and satisfaction, dependence, craving, confidence to resist drinking and perception of health. Demographic data are also recorded. Qualitative interviews are conducted with a sub-sample of 30 participants. Outcomes are assessed at 3-month and 12-month follow-up points and indicate significant improvement on the main measures in terms of both home detoxification treatment per se, and particularly the psychological intervention. The research findings confirm that the processes of change in alcohol treatment are dependent on the interaction of a number of complex factors. These include the availability and quality of social networks, and the individual characteristics that enhance the development and utilisation of such networks, in particular, gender role orientation. It is concluded that psychological masculinity and femininity may be more salient to contemporary society than gender differences.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.637433  DOI: Not available
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