Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.637250
Title: Kinetics of protein adsorption on rigid particles
Author: Hayek, B. O.
Awarding Body: University College of Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 1994
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Abstract:
The kinetics of protein (bovine serum albumin BSA) adsorption on a newly developed rigid silica-based absorbent (J.T. Baker) have been studied using ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction surface chemistries in stirred tank and chromatographic packed bed modes. The effect of particle size (5,15,40 μm), initial concentration and, for the case of a packed bed, the flow velocity on the kinetics and the performance of the process were investigated. For this purpose, a model involving a two stage of (liquid film and pore diffusion) mechanism was developed. The equilibrium isotherm and the absorbent specifications were determined by separate experiments. The capacity for BSA surface area and the porosity for the 40 μm particles differed from those of the 15 and 5 μm particles. Pore diffusivities evaluated by fitting the model to stirred tank concentration-time profiles provided good fits to the packed bed breakthrough curves. The liquid film resistance was virtually negligible for the range of particle size and flow velocities. The process was thus controlled by the pore diffusion stage. The packed bed study involved a detailed investigation of the effects of varying flow velocity, particle size, surface chemistry and adsorption versus desorption on the shape of the breakthrough curve and on the effective diffusivity. The pore diffusivity varied principally with the protein concentration, with pore size and with interactions between protein molecules in solution caused by salt concentration changes. The ratio of diffusivities in the pores and free solution varied in the range 1/36 to 1/252. The mathematical model has been validated and can now be used to predict the kinetic performance for process design of different protein/adsorbent systems.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.637250  DOI: Not available
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