Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.637063
Title: Characterization of a rapidly solidified dispersion strengthened aluminium alloy for advanced high temperature aerospace applications
Author: Go, B. C.
Awarding Body: University College of Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 1991
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Abstract:
A high temperature dispersion strengthened aluminium alloy produced by rapid solidification has been characterized. The alloy, formerly named FVS0812 (Al-8.0Fe-1.4V-1.7Si), has now been designated as 8009 Al by the Aluminium Association. Elevated temperature exposure and mechanical tests up to 427oC (800oF) were performed. Constant load creep-rupture tests were also performed. High temperature 8009 Al was found to have outstanding thermal stability up to 427oC (800oF). It retained 100% of its tensile properties after exposure for 1000 hours, and after 2065 hours at 316oC (600oF). Theoretical prediction of the average dispersoid size after a 427oC (800oF) exposure for 1000 hours was made based from the Volume Diffusion Controlled Theory for particle coarsening. The room and elevated temperature properties are comparable, if not superior, than those of other commercially available dispersion strengthened and conventional aluminium alloys, and commercially pure Ti. The tensile properties of 8009 Al were also found to be isotropic at all temperatures. Long-term prediction of the creep-rupture properties at 316oC (600oF) showed that at low strains (< .20%), the Larson-Miller parametric method provides a more conservative prediction than the Manson-Haferd approach. However, at higher strains (> .20%), the Manson-Haferd approach gave a more conservative prediction than the Larson-Miller method. The creep-rupture properties of 8009 Al are comparable, if not superior, to other commercially available high temperature aluminium alloys. The results of the mechanical testing are discussed in terms of current theories on the strength and creep properties of particle strengthened aluminium alloys.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.637063  DOI: Not available
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