Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.636799
Title: Anatomical and optical correlates of the peripheral retina in myopia
Author: Cameron, Lorraine A.
Awarding Body: Glasgow Caledonian University
Current Institution: Glasgow Caledonian University
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
Myopia has emerged as a major public health concern due to increased prevalence, particularly in East Asia, in recent years. The development and progression of myopia is complex and due to genetic and environmental factors and the interaction between them. Much research has investigated the role of near work, the accommodation response and resultant defocus on myopic development. Investigations of defocus across the peripheral retina and the influence on myopic development have been of interest in recent years. Within this thesis various optical and anatomical aspects of the central and peripheral retina have been investigated in emmetropes and myopes to identify differences that may aid the understanding of myopic development. Accommodation microfluctuations remain unchanged when information co_ntained within the central part of a stimulus is optimal (4cpd) regardless of the details within the peripheral part. When information contained within the central part of a stimulus is blurred (O.5cpd), as long as there is some clear (4cpd) peripheral information present within the central 8° of the stimulus, myopes will utilise this to regulate the accommodation response and have reduced microfluctuations. Emmetropes may not utilise this peripheral information, or else the accommodation microfluctuations of the emmetropes cannot become any smaller, for example due to anatomical restrictions. Accommodation response thresholds increase with increasing eccentricity in emmetropes and at a faster rate in the myopes. The increased magnitude of the accommodation response thresholds could explain why myopes have increased accommodation microfluctuations with increasing eccentricity.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.636799  DOI: Not available
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