Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.636744
Title: The study of the urinary nucleosides as potential tumour markers using modern mass spectrometric techniques
Author: Dudley, E.
Awarding Body: University of Wales Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
This study investigates the potential of urinary modified nucleosides as tumour markers. The first task carried out was the development of a reproducible purification method, necessary to extract these compounds from cancer patients' urine, and to separate them from other urinary components that would interfere in further analyses. Secondly the high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry analytical procedures to be used in the identification and quantification of the modified nucleosides were optimized using commercially available standard compounds. The nucleoside levels in the urine of the healthy population and cancer patients (normalized using urinary creatinine levels) were then compared. The effects of factors other than disease stage (such as age, sex, treatment and site of cancer) upon urinary nucleoside levels were also determined, and the nucleoside profiles of cultured cells, in varying degrees of transformation, and of aseptic fluid from cancer patients examined. Eighteen nucleosides were identified in urine by these procedures. A number of the nucleosides examined exhibited urinary levels that correlated with disease progression. These included N2, N2-dimethylguanosine breast cancer patients and pseudouridine in most of the cancer patients examined. These findings must be considered as exciting but as yet preliminary data from a pilot study, and the potential of these modified nucleosides to act as tumour markers is fully discussed, together with the degree of certainty of the identification of the nucleosides.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.636744  DOI: Not available
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