Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.636719
Title: Nucleotide excision repair and nucleosome positioning in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MFA2 gene
Author: Yu, S.
Awarding Body: University of Wales Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
The Saccharomyces cerevisiae checkpoint genes RAD9, RAD17, RAD24, and MEC3 are required for the transcriptional induction of a group of genes including some for DNA repair. In this thesis two of the checkpoint genes, RAD9 and RAD24, and two nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes RAD16 and RAD26, have been investigated for their role in inducible NER at the MFA2 gene at nucleotide resolution. In wild type cells, enhanced NER is detected in cells received a minor UV irradiation one hour prior to a main UV dose compared to cells only treated with the main UV dose. This inducible NER is not detectable in mutant strains rad9, rad24, rad9rad24, rad16 and rad26. These data suggest that inducible NER is dependent on the checkpoint genes RAD9 and RAD24, on the RAD16 gene that is essential for global genome repair (GGR), and on the RAD26 gene that is required for efficient transcription-coupled repair (TCR). A second aspect of the thesis examined the role of histone acetylation in NER. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) play an important role in remodelling chromatin structure during transcription activation. Here, the role of one HAT, Gen5, in the NER of UV induced CPDs in the upstream region of MFA2 has been examined. In Δgcn5 strains, NER of both strands in the control region of MFA2 is slower than in wild type cells. As Gen5 regulates MFA2 transcription, probably through chromatin modification, its role in chromatin organization in the control region of MFA2 would appear to influence DNA repair in that region.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.636719  DOI: Not available
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