Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.636687
Title: Studies of molecular evolution using an allozyme database
Author: Woodwark, M.
Awarding Body: University College of Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 1993
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Abstract:
The relative influence of stochastic and deterministic forces at the molecular level is a central question in population genetics. Two main theoretical frameworks have been proposed to account for genetic variation in natural populations revealed by molecular techniques, these are neutral and selection theories. In 1980, an allozyme database project was initiated to test a prediction from neutral theory concerning the relationship between genetic diversity and evolutionary rate. As the databases now contain allele frequency data for 1311 species of animals and 209 species of plants, they are large enough to be applied to a number of neutral theory predictions. This thesis considers the historical and philosophical background to the neutralist-selectionist controversy; details the opeation of the allozyme databases; their construction, organisation and use in analysis, and presents the results of four independent sets of analysis that test predictions from neutral theory. The overall conclusion that can be drawn from these analyses is that neutral theory is sufficient to explain the majority of allozyme variation. However, some of the results cannot be explained within this framework, which may indicate evidence of the influence of selection. The work presented in this thesis illustrates the applicability and effectiveness of the database approach in addressing the neutralist-selectionist debate. Now that the resource, the databases, has been put in place, it an be used to answer a range of questions in population and evolutionary genetics.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.636687  DOI: Not available
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