Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.636278
Title: Leaching rates during the weathering of coated steels
Author: Collins, E. V.
Awarding Body: University of Wales Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 2000
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Abstract:
Steel which has no protective coating on it will struggle to survive in the environment as all that is required to initiate corrosion is water and oxygen. Coatings were therefore developed to prevent this and in doing so elongate the life of the product. British Steel use a range of products to protect their structural steel, HPS200 plastisol being the flagship coating, produced in the UK and sold around the world. Plastisol has more resistance to environmental degradation than steel but it still degrades when exposed to aggressive environments, keeping guarantees to within 30 years, the specific length depending on several predetermined factors. The degradation products are thought to be minimal and the integrity of panels already under long term test support this theory. This project was carried out with the intention of determining what concentrations of the products, if any, leach out of the plastisol systems. Model systems were placed at natural weathering sites and in accelerated weathering chambers to promote degradation of the coatings. Several standard and novel techniques have been used to monitor the physical and chemical characteristics of the coatings and hence aid the determination of the contents of the leachates. Gas analysis has been performed although not in any great depth. Results show that the coatings loose very small amounts of plasticiser and undergo cross linking. Both of these occurrences are expected to a certain extent and, within the realms of this work are not in sufficient quantities to cause concern. The leachates show metals, anions and organics present in quantities similar to those detected in the control samples. Gaseous analysis did not highlight any levels of chemical which should cause concern. The plastisols tested under these specific circumstances do not pose a threat to the environment.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Eng.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.636278  DOI: Not available
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