Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.636081
Title: Computational modelling of large-scale reinforced concrete structures subject to dynamic loading
Author: Bere, Adam Toby
Awarding Body: University of Wales Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
The objective of the thesis is to develop a methodology that provides a validated computational procedure for simulating the response of reinforced concrete structures when subjected to abnormal impact loading. Of particular importance is the ability to predict the behaviour of the structure within the non-linear range, where extensive cracking of the concrete can take place in conjunction with yielding of the steel reinforcement, resulting in mechanisms leading to scabbing, spallation, penetration and possibly complete failure. The need to be able to predict such structural responses arises in several areas of Civil Engineering. For example, the capacity of safety critical structures to withstand abnormal impact loads that are beyond the design criteria must frequently be demonstrated. Any risk assessment, although employing probability concepts, will invariably necessitate a deterministic measure of the load carrying capacity and the failure mechanisms involved. A computational tool for simulating the ultimate load response of impacted reinforced concrete structures is developed and subsequently validated by assessment of the performance against carefully designed experimental tests. The validation also incorporates a procedure to fully assess the relevant parameters to effectively characterise the materials, including strain rate effects. Scabbing, the ejection of concrete particles from the distal face of an impacted slab, is a prominent failure mode dependant on the combination of various failure mechanisms. Therefore, an impact experiment that describes the extent of scabbing has been reproduced in order to demonstrate the full capability of the numerical methods.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.636081  DOI: Not available
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