Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.635726
Title: Preparation for disaster management in Saudi Arabia
Author: Al Shehri, M. M.
Awarding Body: University College of Swansea
Current Institution: Swansea University
Date of Award: 1995
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Abstract:
The incidence and prevalence and the nature of disasters experienced in Arab countries (natural or man-made) requires each country to consider a comprehensive disaster preparedness programme based upon warning systems, inter-sectoral co-ordination, institutions, training programmes and shelter projects. In Saudi Arabia the present health care system has grown out of a few small clinics which were established in the Makkah area which then, after 1951, with the creation of the Ministry of Health, developed into a comprehensive system of health care. In addition to the MoH, eleven other independent health agencies provide health care to their respective populations. Each agency has its own budget, recruits its own personnel and is responsible for running its own health care delivery system. Additionally there is a private sector which is also given financial assistance by the government. Considerable progress has been made in the field of general health but, as yet little has been done to prepare for disasters or other unexpected events, despite several attempts by the government to initiate such action. These attempts have ended up as a series of plans and resolutions which consider modern warning systems, trained disaster manpower, better casualty management, good accommodation and underground hospitals and clinics. However, these plans do not seem to have moved beyond the drawing board. The research highlighted the fact that whilst the Saudi health system is well geared to normal definitions of health care, it is poorly oriented towards the unexpected. There is a lack of clarity of role at the centre of the organisation and, as the research shows, those who would be centrally involved in the management of any disaster do not appear to have any common grasp of what sort of systems exist. There was also found, within this group, a consistent view that disaster planning was a waste of time.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.635726  DOI: Not available
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