Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.634338
Title: How are educational psychologists' professional identities shaped by the available discourses?
Author: Waters, H. T.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5350 5563
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This research explores how educational psychologists' (EPs) professional identities are communicated and constructed through discourses. As such, discourses at both a macro and micro level, including texts and talk are of interest. Discourse analysis drawing on a critical framework was used in an attempt to illuminate tensions amongst discourses, which shape EPs' professional identities. The analysis grapples with how the wider discourses made available to EPs resist or affirm those at an individual level. Interviews were carried out to explore how EPs' professional identities are communicated through their talk about professional practice experiences. Furthermore, the research is interested in how professional values are reflected in the EPs' talk about complex casework. The analysis suggests multiple discursive constructions contribute to the shaping of EPs' professional identity and that these relate to the wider discourses. Five wider discourses were identified as a result of the analysis. These include, 'EP as relational worker', 'EP as research practitioner', 'EP as scientist practitioner ', 'EP as LA officer' and 'EP as advocate for the child'. The research contributes to critical conversations in the field of educational psychology and emphasises the importance of exploring the relationship between professional identity and practice when considering future directions for the profession.
Supervisor: Williams, A. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Ed.C.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.634338  DOI: Not available
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