Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.634244
Title: Stylistic fusion in a postmodern context
Author: Swindells, Rachel Justine
Awarding Body: University of Leeds
Current Institution: University of Leeds
Date of Award: 1999
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Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to examine the links between postmodernism and music ‘fusing’ what are commonly described as popular and classical styles. Much postmodern theory has discussed the relationship between ‘high’ and ‘low' and recognised eclecticism within art, but how does fusion connect with this? An investigation of terminology and definitions together with a discussion of historical precedents for contemporary cross-influences provides a base from which to explore fusion and the postmodern. A framework oulining postmodernism’s background and its relevance to music is used in conjunction with an analysis of works by Talk Talk, Mike Oldfield and Graham Fitkin. Developing the concept of what might constitute the postmodern in music, theargument moves beyond the consideration of inherent traits which may or may not suggest postmodernism. A broader concept based on a sense of postmodern spirit is developed, recognising the importance of the roles of context and aesthetic as well as characteristics within the text. A detailed analysis of various works by the chosen artists allows exploration of both the concept of fused music and the application of postmodern theory. It will be suggested that, although these musicians produce music which displays a number of traits which are considered by many to reflect postmodernism, the music in question does not necessarily represent a postmodern aesthetic: the most postmodern of the works considered is also the least fused. It will be argued that the characteristics of music itself cause considerable problems in the application of postmodern theory, and that fusion, by its very definition and because of the connotative qualities that specific musical references often carry, does not correlate to concepts of the postmodern.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.634244  DOI: Not available
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