Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.633389
Title: Intimate partner violence : a gender inclusive exploration
Author: Sabin, Natasha
ISNI:       0000 0004 5366 3457
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Developing a more accurate understanding of the true nature of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is an important area of research for reducing all forms of IPV. This thesis aims to explore the field of IPV from a gender inclusive perspective, with a particular focus on implications for preventive practice. This is achieved using three pieces of research. First a systematic review of the literature investigates the psychological consequences of physical IPV on male and female victims. This demonstrates a significant lack of research in this area, although findings indicate that IPV victimisation impacts negatively on the psychological wellbeing of males and females. Second an investigation into the impact of primary prevention media campaigns on Western female student’s normative beliefs about IPV is presented. Results demonstrate that female aggression is considered to be more acceptable and less harmful than male aggression and that primary prevention media campaigns have a significant impact upon these beliefs, particularly with regards female aggression. Finally, a critique of a psychometric measure widely used to understand aggression in couples is presented. The critique of the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS2) highlighted a number of strengths of the measure, particularly its applicability to a wide selection of the population and ease of use. The limitations of the CTS2 are also discussed. Recommendations for practice and future research are also presented.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Foren.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.633389  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
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