Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.633191
Title: After the goldrush : the history of popular music funding in Canada
Author: Shapiro, Shain
ISNI:       0000 0004 5365 0787
Awarding Body: Birkbeck (University of London)
Current Institution: Birkbeck (University of London)
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This dissertation is a cultural and historical analysis of the history of popular music funding in Canada, from 1949 to 2013. Canada has an extensive public subsidy system for popular music, deriving from the implementation of content quotas for publicly licensed airwaves and the need to supply these airwaves with appropriate content. This thesis evaluates and analyses the history that engendered these policies to reveal their impact on the concept of Canadian identity as a whole, and the impact of Canadian identity formation on the popular music industries. Through six decades of policy interventionism, Canada’s popular music structure has grown into a set of structures within structures, combining direct federal subsidies, regionally specific support and private initiatives mandated by public policy. However, in this history, never has the total system been conceptually audited as a whole, nor has its underlying cultural and economic impact been analysed. Some see this support as a lifeline while others a tax, resulting in a set of structures framed on policy to simultaneously develop national cultural unity and economic prosperity. These policies have shifted from supporting Canadian cultural policy to more business driven, economic objectives, despite being mandated, legislated and ultimately beholden to Canadian cultural polices, nationalism and protectionism. By dissecting the history, this thesis aims to unravel an extensive and unique case study between the popular music industries and government as a whole.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.633191  DOI: Not available
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