Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.632926
Title: Experimental and numerical modelling of walking locomotion on vertically vibrating low-frequency structures
Author: Đặng, Hiệp Vũ
ISNI:       0000 0004 5364 2058
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Vibration serviceability is a governing factor in the design of low-frequency structures, which are sensitive to human-induced loads. To achieve reliable vibration estimates, structural engineers need to model the combined pedestrianstructure system as close to reality as possible. The most uncertain aspect in the modelling is accounting for pedestrian interaction with perceptibly vibrating structure. To improve understanding of this aspect, the thesis aims to provide experimental and numerical modelling of walking locomotion on lively structures in the vertical direction. Experimental programmes were conducted to provide characteristics of walking gait on both rigid and lively surfaces, where the former was used as benchmark for comparison. Both kinematic and kinetic parameters were measured using a motion capture system. Discrepancies of the gait parameters between data collected on imperceptibly and perceptibly vibrating surfaces, as consequences of the pedestrian-structure dynamic interaction, were quantified. The unique database provided in this thesis contributes to the understanding of locomotion on the vibrating surface and, therefore, can be used for calibration of pedestrian models intended for civil engineering applications. An interactive model was developed, using a biomechanical model to represent the pedestrian. The novel feature of this model is to account for two-way interaction between the pedestrian and the structure. A sensitivity analysis and validations of the proposed model against experimental data were also provided. Results of the modelling work inform designers detailed evaluations of performance of the model on both virtual and as-built structures.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) ; University of Warwick
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.632926  DOI: Not available
Keywords: TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General)
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