Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.631973
Title: Non-native vowel processing as reflected by the brain : the Mismatch Response, the Acoustic Change Complex and Dynamic Causal Modeling
Author: Oliver, G. L.
Awarding Body: University College London (University of London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2014
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access through Institution:
Abstract:
The aim of this thesis was to examine how auditory vowel processing by native and non-native speakers is reflected neuronally, specifically by the Mismatch Response (MMNm), the Acoustic Change Complex (ACC) and Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM). We investigated whether these different brain responses represent different levels of speech sound processing and how the mismatch response is represented in the neuronal source architecture of native language (L1) and second language (L2) speakers. In study 1, MEG MMNm data on L1 and L2 vowels was collected from English controls and French L1 speakers with a varying range of L2 proficiency. Additionally, subjects performed a range of behavioural tasks which targeted vowel perception (category discrimination and vowel identification) and production. The MEG data from this study was analysed conventionally and with dynamic causal modeling in order to determine neuronal sources and the dynamic source architecture in the L1 and L2 brain. In study 2, English controls and German subjects performed behavioural tasks (auditory discrimination and a combined assimilation/goodness of fit task). In study 3, EEG ACC data on L1 and L2 vowels was collected from L1 and German L2 speakers of English with a varying range of L2 proficiency. In study 4, EEG ACC data on L1 and L2 vowels was collected from L1 and German L2 speakers of English with a varying range of L2 proficiency. In summary, the MMNm indicated whether a speech sound had gained phoneme status in an L2. DCM showed that there is no difference architecturally and functionally between an L1 and a highly proficient L2 speaker’s brain with regards to vowel processing. The right hemisphere supports the left during L2 vowel processing in low ability L2 speakers. The ACC was linked to individual vowel identification abilities, supporting the results from the DCM data.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.631973  DOI: Not available
Share: