Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.631679
Title: Tackling racist conflicts in greek primary schools through drama
Author: Lioliou, Theocharia
Awarding Body: Birmingham City University
Current Institution: Birmingham City University
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
The recent transformation of Greece from a homogenous country into one that is a receptacle for people from different cultures occurred in a society unprepared for such change, resulting in severe cases of racism, inside and outside school. The purpose of this study was to explore for the first time in the Greek setting the response of young children who had displayed prejudiced behaviour to a series of drama lessons. It also examines the efficacy of process drama in the hands of a novice in this approach drama teacher. The project was based in antiracist education theory, combining elements from multicultural education, and applying conventions of drama approaches with those prevailing in process drama/drama in education. This was a multiple case study research drawing also upon action research methodology. It consists of two pilots and three applications in different primary school classrooms of seven- to eight-year-olds. Preliminary research identified the sample through anonymous questionnaires and the main field work consisted of a series of drama sessions; semi-structured interviews and participant observation took place before and after each class application. The setting was found to be extremely monocultural, with traditional teaching methods still being prevalent and racist views present among both children and teachers. The results from the drama were encouraging, proving that, even in the hands of a beginner, drama can inspire empathy to pupils through deep emotional experiences which contain the potential for changing beliefs.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.631679  DOI: Not available
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