Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.631285
Title: Mental health and service use of adults with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder
Author: Underwood, Lisa
Awarding Body: King's College London (University of London)
Current Institution: King's College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects 20-30% of adults with intellectual disability. This group are vulnerable to mental health problems and poor quality of life. They usually share a common mental health care pathway with adults who have intellectual disability without ASD. However, there is little evidence on whether this is an appropriate approach. Aim: The thesis aimed to explore differences between those with and without ASD among specialist mental health service users with intellectual disability. Method: The needs, mental health, behaviour, social functioning and service use of 50 participants with ASD from a specialist mental health service for adults with intellectual disability in South East London were compared with 48 participants without ASD. ASD diagnoses were assessed using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS). In addition, anonymised case records provided routinely collected, clinical data on 788 participants. Results: Participants with ASD consumed fewer services than those without ASD despite having more needs. ASD was a significant predictor of poorer mental health and behaviour. Participants with ASD had poorer social functioning than those without ASD. However, when severe intellectual disability, absence of a psychiatric disorder and needs were taken into account, ASD was not a significant predictor of poorer social functioning. The rate of clinically diagnosed ASD among specialist mental health services users with intellectual disability was 33.5%. However, there was evidence that undiagnosed ASD and unrecognised ASD behaviours were common. Conclusion: The mental health, behaviour and social functioning of specialist mental health service users with intellectual disability was poorer for those with ASD and significantly associated with factors that characterise many of these individuals. There appeared to be high levels of undiagnosed ASD and a lack of ASD-specific assessment protocols or care pathways. However, these findings may be limited to the specific service user group sampled. More research is needed to determine whether increased recognition of ASD and improved access to services would lead to better outcomes for adults with intellectual disability who have mental health needs.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.631285  DOI: Not available
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