Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.631021
Title: A qualitative study of fathers' experiences of a Scottish neonatal intensive care unit : and clinical research portfolio
Author: Robertson, Kim
ISNI:       0000 0004 5355 0188
Awarding Body: University of Glasgow
Current Institution: University of Glasgow
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Objectives: 1) To gain an in-depth understanding of fathers’ experiences of having their preterm infant hospitalised in a Scottish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and 2) to develop a clearer understanding of fathers’ support needs. Methods: Six fathers of infants cared for in a Scottish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit completed semi-structured interviews about their experiences. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to identify themes emerging from these interviews. Results: Six overarching themes were identified: 1) adjusting to the demands of the situation, 2) relationships with staff, 3) technology: a divided opinion, 4) becoming a father, 5) emotional reactions, and 6) adaptive responses. Conclusion: This study offers an in-depth understanding of fathers’ experiences of having their preterm infant cared for in a Scottish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and has helped to develop a clearer understanding of fathers’ support needs. Findings: (1) validate the relevance of the constructs of support outlined within an existing conceptual model of parents’ support needs (the Nurse Parent Support Model) for fathers in the NICU, (2) justify modifications to the existing model to incorporate additional forms of support which are not currently included, and (3) indicate how this revised model could be implemented in clinical practice to inform the provision of Family Centred Care and thus promote parent and infant wellbeing.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.631021  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
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