Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.630427
Title: Attitudes to ageing : a systematic review of attitudes to ageing and mental health, and a cross-sectional analysis of attitudes to ageing and quality of life in older adults
Author: Long, Sarah Charlotte May
ISNI:       0000 0004 5353 8234
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This thesis portfolio examines attitudes to ageing in older adults, and explores the impact that attitudes to ageing have on mental health status and quality of life. Attitudes to ageing are becoming more widely measured in older adults, particularly with the ageing population but also due the recent development of the Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire. There is growing evidence to suggest a relationship between attitudes to ageing and mental health status in older adults. However, no study has explored the association between attitudes to ageing and quality of life in older adults, incorporating the Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire and the World Health Organisation Quality of Life measures. Firstly a systematic search of studies exploring the relationship between attitudes to ageing and mental health in older adults (≥55 years) was undertaken. All potentially relevant studies were screened against inclusion and exclusion criteria. Variables related to attitudes to ageing, ageism, age stereotypes, depression and anxiety were considered in this review. Twelve papers met inclusion criteria for the systematic review. The setting, culture and measures incorporated varied across the studies. A negative attitude to ageing was associated with poorer mental health status in older adults across all 12 studies. The second part of this portfolio was an international cross-sectional analysis of attitudes to ageing and quality of life in older adults (≥57 years). Correlation and regression analyses explored the relationship between attitudes to ageing and QOL and investigated the impact of socio-demographic variables, depression and attitudes to ageing on two quality of life measures. The two constructs were positively related; a more positive attitude to ageing was associated with a better quality of life. Further, positive attitudes to ageing was a significant predictor of a better QOL. The sample was then divided into two age groups (57-79 years and 80+ years) and attitudes to ageing and quality of life ratings were compared. Results revealed more negative ratings in attitudes to ageing and quality of life in the over 80 year old age group. Correlation and regression analyses were then explored across both age groups. More positive attitudes to ageing was a significant predictor of better quality of life across both age groups. Overall, the two studies in this thesis portfolio highlight the need to better recognise and target older adults’ negative attitudes to ageing. Appropriate psychological interventions could be provided to challenge negative attitudes and promote attitude change in an attempt to improve mental health difficulties and quality of life in older adults. Continued use of the Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire and quality of life psychometric measures in clinical practice and research is encouraged.
Supervisor: Power, Michael; Gillanders, David; Laidlaw, Kenneth Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.630427  DOI: Not available
Keywords: attitudes to ageing ; older adults ; quality of life
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