Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.629440
Title: Climate change and internal displacement : a critical analysis of land rights in the context of slow-onset impact
Author: Dutta, Ashirbani
ISNI:       0000 0004 5348 8548
Awarding Body: University of Essex
Current Institution: University of Greenwich
Date of Award: 2014
Availability of Full Text:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Thesis embargoed until 30 Nov 2018
Abstract:
Climate change disasters and human impact in recent times have been largely obvious, causing massive damage and destruction. Out of the millions of people affected by the various impacts such as flash flooding, cyclones and hurricanes across the globe, many have already suffered from displacement. In the future, many more people will suffer the long, slow effects of incremental environmental change affecting their living conditions, food security and lives more broadly. In many of the regions, local population particularly the communities are struggling to maintain their livelihood, and other basic conditions of survival as environment, land, soil quality and local resources continues to degrade, threatening local population with the risks of potential displacement. In few extreme cases such as desertification, I people are already forced to leave their home. In some of the Pacific Island atolls, people are already forced to relocate to some of the neighbouring islands.2 These are the people that this thesis will focus upon, and, in particular, their human rights as regards displacement from their homes and lands, as well as when impacted by potential threats of displacement. The thesis analyses this particular group of persons and aims to establish from a human rights perspective what their rights are due to climate change impacts and displacement and seek to analyse the extent to which it is addressed by the legal framework.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.629440  DOI: Not available
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