Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.629201
Title: In search of the whole story : a reconstruction of organisational communication
Author: Caesar, R. E.
Awarding Body: Nottingham Trent University
Current Institution: Nottingham Trent University
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
Based on the experiences and insight of a global conglomerate leader in engineering consultancy focused on corporate storytelling in the workplace, this document provides insight into how interpretation and misunderstanding are shared. This thesis grows out of awareness that, over the past five years or so, the way in which an organisation can use, share and disseminate corporate stories. We sometimes can take the use of corporate storytelling for granted, in particular, that organisational stories in the workplace are told for the right reasons. But in too many organisations, it can be difficult to decipher an ‘official’ and ‘unofficial’ story. An official corporate story that is tarnished by ambiguity will be modified and re-interpreted as the story goes around the organisation. Despite official attempts to defend the validity of a story, there will be times when there is conflict with unofficial interpretations of the story. One of the most intriguing aspects of corporate storytelling is how a trusting working relationship between the storyteller, the corporate story, and the recipients is a key actor. As such, the use of storytelling in an ambiguous working environment can lead to multiple interpretations. There is the belief that if the chain-of-trust is damaged the interrelationship will be hampered. It is time, in my opinion, to focus on the type of storytellers in the workplace that can emerge and manipulate a working environment. This paper provides an appreciation into the practice of corporate storytellers, and the impact of manipulating other individuals using status and language. The document also draws on how trust and decision-making can be hampered. The paper concludes with some of the research opportunities and ethical challenges that are inherent in this particular research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.B.A.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.629201  DOI: Not available
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