Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.629074
Title: The economic lives of immigrants in Ireland : evidence from the Census of Population of Ireland, 2006
Author: Kiely, Daniel F.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5348 1063
Awarding Body: University of Ulster
Current Institution: Ulster University
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This study addresses critical questions in relation to the factors affecting the economic lives, performance and assimilation of immigrants in Ireland. Data from the Census of Population of Ireland, 2006, is used. Three key themes are addressed: the labour market outcomes and performance of immigrants in Ireland; immigrant and gender equality in the Irish labour market; and the housing outcomes of immigrants in Ireland. Preliminary statistics show that immigrants in Ireland have favourable labour market characteristics. Utilising econometric estimation techniques, it is reported that, ceteris paribus, immigrants from NI, GB, EU 13 and USA are more likely, relative to the native population, of having occupational success (being employed in Professional, Managerial or Technical (PMT) jobs). Other immigrants report a very different labour market experience, where, positive labour market characteristics do not translate into occupational success. Others experience a structural disadvantage in the Irish labour market. All immigrants are less likely to be in self-employment, relative to natives. Education and subjects studied play a key role for immigrants' labour market integration and success. Employing equality adjusted proportions, it is reported that immigrants experience greater within group inequality than natives. This study paints the gender dimension of immigration in Ireland in a favourable light. Female immigrants do not appear to suffer from a double disadvantage in the Irish labour market.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.629074  DOI: Not available
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