Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.628371
Title: Analysis, design and implementation of multichannel audio systems
Author: De Sena, Enzo
Awarding Body: King's College London (University of London)
Current Institution: King's College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
This thesis is concerned with the analysis, design and implementation of multichannel audio systems. The design objective is to reconstruct a given sound field such that it is perceptually equivalent to the recorded one. A framework for the design of circular microphone arrays is proposed. This framework is based on fitting of psychoacoustic data and enables the design of both coincident and quasi-coincident arrays. Results of formal listening experiments suggest that the proposed methodology performs on a par with state of the art methods, albeit with a more graceful degradation away from the centre of the loudspeaker array. A computational model of auditory perception is also developed to estimate the subjects' response in a broader class of conditions than the ones considered in the listening experiments. The model predictions suggest that quasi-coincident microphone arrays result in auditory events that are easier to localise for off centre listeners. Two technologies are developed to enable using the proposed framework for recording of real sound fields (e.g. live concert) and virtual ones (e.g. video-games). Differential microphones are identified as desirable candidates for the case of real sound fields and are adapted to suit the framework requirements. Their robustness to self-noise is assessed and measurements of a third-order prototype are presented. Finally, a scalable and interactive room acoustic simulator is proposed to enable virtual recordings in simulated sound fields.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.628371  DOI: Not available
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