Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.628044
Title: The sustainability of local authority museums : a legislative anomaly working in a conflicting policy framework?
Author: Gates, Natalie
Awarding Body: King's College London (University of London)
Current Institution: King's College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
In this thesis I have attempted to analyse the effectiveness of the legislative and policy framework in relation to the museums operated by local authorities in England. In particular, I have focused on whether this framework is suitable or sustainable for the long term provision of such museums. Particular regard is given to acquisition and disposal of property from these museums, including the areas of object mobility and repatriation of artefacts. Chapter one sets out the working assumptions that this thesis rests upon. The second chapter appraises the modern context within which local authority museums operate. Chapter three assesses the historical development of museums and how this has affected the legal framework. In the fourth chapter, the focus is upon the problems of permanent acquisition of artefacts. Chapter five re-examines the controversial area of disposal of objects from museums and the repatriation of spoliated artefacts and human remains. The sixth chapter reviews how developments in art mobility have benefited local authority museums. The final chapter draws together the findings and assesses whether council museums are variable in the future under the current legislative and policy framework. The thesis concludes that while improvements could be made to the legislation, it is unlikely to happen. It would be more effective to make such changes through the policy issued by the Arts Council and the Museums Association. Such changes also could bridge the divergence between law, policy and practice. A variety of primary and secondary sources were used throughout this thesis. Due to the fact that this is a specialized and globalized area many of the sources can be found on the internet and in international journals. However, the core of this dissertation rests upon statutes, case law, government commissioned reports, local authority committee reports, national and local policy documents, and books.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.628044  DOI: Not available
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