Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.627907
Title: The role of soccer in the personal development of socio-economically disadvantaged individuals
Author: Cowan, Daryl T.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5366 2884
Awarding Body: University of the West of Scotland
Current Institution: University of the West of Scotland
Date of Award: 2014
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Abstract:
The aim of this thesis was to explore the role of soccer in the personal development of socio-economically disadvantaged individuals in the UK. Despite the adage that soccer is an effective vehicle for positive youth development and for diverting young people from delinquency and crime, little empirical evidence exists concerning how and why soccer can help transform the lives of disadvantaged individuals. Accordingly, this thesis employed a range of qualitative and longitudinal quantitative designs to address these gaps in the existing literature. Study one employed life story methods to explore the role of soccer in the life of coach who works with disadvantaged youth. The subsequent studies adopted the theoretical framework of self-determination theory (SOT; Deci & Ryan, 2000), to examine the coaching and psychological processes within an organised soccer programme for disadvantaged individuals. This thesis revealed the significance of soccer in the lives of disadvantaged individuals. Collectively, the results highlight the importance of organised sport and education programmes in the personal development of socio-economically disadvantaged individuals. More specifically, the role of the coach within these programmes was found to be particularly important in this development. The thesis presents key practical implications for the development and delivery of sport and education programmes for disadvantaged individuals and makes several advancements of SOT.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.627907  DOI: Not available
Share: