Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.626635
Title: The biopsychosocial model of dementia : its use in clinical practice : a pilot study
Author: Revolta, Catherine
ISNI:       0000 0004 5362 7114
Awarding Body: UCL (University College London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Background: Caring for people with dementia can be an emotionally challenging task and it is often linked with low job satisfaction and burnout amongst care staff. Training care home staff is a potentially valuable intervention in improving staff well-being and ensuring they are equipped to provide the best possible care for people with dementia. This review aimed to establish the impact of training on staff and to assess which interventions had the greatest influence. It also aimed to explore the influence of training intensity and potential barriers to its success. Method: A database search of studies evaluating staff training interventions in dementia care was conducted. The search revealed 207 papers, 188 of which were subsequently excluded based on pre-specified criteria. Nineteen studies were included in the review and synthesised using a quality rating tool designed for use with a range of study designs. Results: Overall the studies were found to be of variable quality. Sixteen studies found a significant change following training in at least one staff domain. Three studies did not find training to have a significant impact. Conclusion: The evidence suggests that training staff can be an effective method of improving staff well-being. Programmes helping staff to manage challenging behaviour appear to be the most beneficial, although further research is required. There is no clear relationship between training intensity and outcome. The majority of studies point to the importance of addressing organisational factors as a barrier to change.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.626635  DOI: Not available
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