Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.626518
Title: Behavioural markers of air traffic controller development
Author: Thompson, D. J.
Awarding Body: University College London (University of London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
A key challenge when introducing new systems and technologies into Air Traffic control (ATC) is to understand levels of emerging controller proficiency ahead of scheduled implementation. Behavioural markers have been used in several complex industries to assess levels of non-technical skill; however these measures invariably focus upon the desired behaviours attained by the end of training. This research has explored how an Air Traffic Controller’s (ATCO’s) overt non-technical behaviour changes in presence and prevalence as they progress their expertise during training. Through document review, expert engagement, and most extensively direct observation of ATCOs during and after training, a number of non-technical behaviours indicative of varying proficiency have been identified. These markers were placed within a simple three-level learning and development framework. Five categories emerged across the behaviours identified; i) input and interaction with the Human Machine Interface (HMI), ii) interaction with others, iii) physical posture and body Language, iv) attitude and mood; v) communications and verbal commentary. An observation sheet containing the markers was iteratively developed, tested, and refined in various ATC environments. Both expert ATCOs undergoing system transition training, and ab-initio trainee controllers undertaking aerodrome training were followed through longitudinal study. A capped frequency count was used to record the precise presence of individual markers. Several dual-observations were also undertaken to determine inter-rater reliability and construct validity. In total, the performance of the individual markers has been evaluated across 129 real-world observations. 30 markers demonstrate reliable correlations for changing prevalence against total system exposure time and provide an original means of tracking and monitoring subtle changes in the behaviour of ATCOs, as their levels of proficiency in the task matures with new ATC systems.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.626518  DOI: Not available
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