Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.625407
Title: Callous-unemotional traits and rejection-sensitivity in relation to subtypes of aggression in adolescent offenders
Author: Robertson, L.
Awarding Body: University College London (University of London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
Volume One of this D.Clin.Psy thesis is a research project investigating rejection-sensitivity and callous-unemotional traits in relation to subtypes of aggression and offending in adolescent offenders. The study was designed to advance the current findings in the area. The volume is divided into three parts. Part One is a literature review examining whether it is possible to apply the construct of psychopathy to youth. Part Two is an empirical paper which outlines the literature relating to aggression and offending in young people, including an exploration of factors thought to underlie these behaviours, including rejection-sensitivity and callous-unemotional traits. The study explored the hypotheses that rejection-sensitivity and callous-unemotional traits would differentially predict subtypes of aggression and offending behaviour. The results are discussed in relation to previous findings. The paper closes with a discussion of the study in terms of limitations, the clinical implications and directions for future research. Part three is a critical appraisal of the research process. It outlines how the area of study came to be selected and includes reflections on the wider research process. The clinical implications arising from the study are discussed in more detail. Some consideration is given throughout to the narratives that society holds about young people who offend and how these narratives might influence our ideas about how best to intervene.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.625407  DOI: Not available
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