Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.625290
Title: Application of stem cell therapy and magnetic resonance imaging in experimental models of cardiovascular diseases
Author: Cheung, K. K.
Awarding Body: University College London (University of London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2010
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access through Institution:
Abstract:
The incidence of cardiovascular diseases has continued to rise despite better understanding of their pathogenesis, and while mortality is declining with advances in treatment, morbidity has increased dramatically due to the chronic complications of surviving the initial event. In contrast to existing interventions, which primarily aim at limiting tissue damage, stem cell therapy has recently emerged as a novel interventional paradigm where damaged myocardial and other vascular tissues can be regenerated and repaired through transplantation of these primitive cells. This Thesis describes a number of studies that aim to investigate some of the therapeutic effects of stem cells in experimental models of cardiovascular diseases; in particular, I have aimed to elucidate the potential cardioprotection offered by stem cells in the very early phase following myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury. The potential effects of stem cell therapy were assessed using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging, which provides unparalleled image quality and accuracy in functional and morphological measurements of the heart. Identification of an effective cell type in attenuating ischaemia-reperfusion injury in the acute phase may provide an extra opportunity to maximise the benefit of stem cell therapy in addition to regenerating damaged tissues at the later stages of disease.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.625290  DOI: Not available
Share: