Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.619494
Title: Exploiting phasor measurement units for enhanced transmission network operation and control
Author: Ashton, Phillip Michael
ISNI:       0000 0004 5358 5815
Awarding Body: Brunel University
Current Institution: Brunel University
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
In order to achieve binding Government targets towards the decarbonisation of the electricity network, the GB power system is undergoing an unprecedented amount of change. A series of new technologies designed to integrate massive volumes of renewable generation, predominantly in the form of offshore wind, asynchronously connecting to the periphery of the transmission system, are transforming the requirements of the network. This displacement of traditional thermal generation is leading to a significant reduction in system inertia, thus making the task of system operation more challenging. It is therefore deemed necessary to develop tools and technologies that provide far greater insight into the state of the power system in real-time and give rise to methods for improving offline modelling practices through an enhanced understanding of the systems performance. To that extent PMUs are seen as one of the key enablers of the Smart Grid, providing accurate time-synchronised measurements on the state of the power system, allowing the true dynamics of the power system to be captured and analysed. This thesis provides an analysis of the existing PMU deployment on the GB transmission system with a view to the future system monitoring requirements. A critical evaluation and comparison is also provided on the suitability of a University based Low Voltage PMU network to further enhance the visibility of the GB system. In addition a novel event detection algorithm based on Detrended Fluctuation Analysis is developed and demonstrated, designed to determine the exact start time of a transmission event, as well as the suitability of such an event for additional transmission system analysis, namely inertia estimation. Finally, a reliable method for the estimation of total system inertia is proposed that includes an estimate of the contribution from residual sources, of which there is currently no visibility. The proposed method identifies the importance of regional inertia and its impact to the operation of the GB transmission system.
Supervisor: Taylor, G. Sponsor: Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) ; National Grid
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Eng.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.619494  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Wide area monitoring systems ; Power systems dynamics ; Frequency response
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