Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.618973
Title: Indigenous methodologies, missionary lives
Author: Battell Lowman, Emma
ISNI:       0000 0004 5356 2189
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This thesis is a study of the lives of two missionaries – Stanley Eaton Higgs and Jean-Marie Raphael Le Jeune – who worked closely with Nlha7kápmx and Secwepemc peoples in the south central Interior of British Columbia (BC), Canada, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It is a study of the networks of power and identity that swirled around these colonial actors on the ‘edge of empire,’ in the midst of a burgeoning settler colonial society, during a time of rapid change and incredible challenge for the Indigenous communities in which these missionaries lived and worked. The crux of this thesis is a methodological intervention into knowledge production in the academy: an attempt to employ Indigenous research methodologies as a non-indigenous researcher working primarily on the archive-informed histories of non-indigenous individuals in Canada. This effort involves an exploration of the processes, results, and impacts of taking up Indigenous research methodologies in these non-traditional domains. Framed around Indigenous knowledge principles of place, language, story, and relationship, and a spatial and temporal ‘spiral’ of ontological movement, this research project challenges commonly perceived positions and responsibilities of Settler Canadian researchers, and opens up new possibilities for ethical and relational research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: University of Warwick ; Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ; Canadian Historical Association ; Centre of Canadian Studies ; University of Edinburgh ; Linnéuniversitetet
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.618973  DOI: Not available
Keywords: F1001 Canada (General)
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