Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.616991
Title: Resource discovery in self-organising distributed systems
Author: Al-Asfoor , Muntasir Jaber Jawad
ISNI:       0000 0004 5348 3480
Awarding Body: University of Essex
Current Institution: University of Essex
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
The rapid growth in demand for computational and data resources have created the need for efficient ways to manage the process of describing and discovering these resources. The most known technology for resource sharing is Grid computing in which multiple computing nodes share computational resources to provide services. However, when investigating the most current work in the field of resource sharing, we identified that there are limitations and challenges in the available techniques. Most of these technologies depend on centralised points of control or service provides which may constitute a single point of failure. This thesis argues that an open distributed system architecture modelled as a multi-agent system would overcome the centralisation problem. This model provides for node/agent autonomy and decentralised control in addition to the ability for self-adaptation without external interference. However, in open distributed systems, the process of resource discovery is rather challenging hence no central service providers. As the network may scale up largely, the resource search process may take an inordinate amount of time. To address this issue, this thesis introduces distributed resource search algorithms enabling agents to search for resources in a time constrained manner. As such environments keep changing; an agent cannot rely on static information. Hence, this thesis introduces a self-organisation algorithm that the agents can use and adapt their connections to maintain better connectivity to the most valuable connections in terms of resources. Finally, this thesis presents an agent organisation formation and search protocol which facilitates the process of searching for resources across a network of agent organisations instead of searching among individual agents.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.616991  DOI: Not available
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