Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.616934
Title: Strategies for German investors to reduce corruption and occupational fraud in El Salvadorian FDls
Author: Sommer, Gregor B.
ISNI:       0000 0004 5348 2672
Awarding Body: University of Surrey
Current Institution: University of Surrey
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
Nearly every organization, regardless of size, type, or industry faces threats associated with corruption, abuse and occupational fraud (Hodge, 2012). Recently, also small and medium sized companies (SMEs) are becoming aware of these threats but many of them still lack a proper risk management to cope with such increasing threats (Funk RMCE et al., 2011). The exposure to these risks increases tremendously when companies establish Foreign Direct Investments (FDls) and the strategies to reduce a company's exposure to them become more complex, because investors have to operate in a cultural environment, which is different from their home country. The aim of this case study is to develop appropriate, practically oriented strategies for investors to avoid or at least to reduce threats of corruption and occupational fraud when they undertake an FDI into El Salvador. A qualitative research methodology is the favourable approach to solve this problem in the real business world, because this research question deals with corruption and occupational fraud, which are very complex research problems with high levels of uncertainty and a need to act flexible (Corbin and Strauss, 2008). The data collection in El Salvador has been undertaken in the form of semi-structured interviews with managers and owners of companies, as well as individuals, people working for NGO's .(Non Governmental Organizations) and business consultants. The empirical data have been analyzed by grounded theory to develop practically oriented strategies for investors.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.616934  DOI: Not available
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