Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.616638
Title: Tourette's syndrome and primary education : child and teacher perceptions
Author: Carnochan , Jean Kathleen
Awarding Body: University of Bristol
Current Institution: University of Bristol
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
This study illustrates the creation, exploration and analysis of the narratives of five primary school children with a diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome (TS). Additionally it provides the analysis of thematic data gathered from semi-structured interviews conducted with their teachers which focused upon the teachers' perspectives of teaching a child with TS. The aims of this study are to: to gauge a better understanding of the children's views of their TS and their primary school experience; consider the interactions within this environment; and consider interventions and approaches that might support children in primary school. The children participating in this study do not wish to be defined by their TS, and they make semi-successful attempts to supress tics. However, their limited success at tic suppression sometimes leads to misinterpretation by teachers of the nature of tics. The children's attempts to suppress their tics and others' misinterpreted responses may have implications for their emotional development and access to learning. The children's teachers report a lack of easily accessible information about TS. Subsequently, they feel unsupported and unknowledgeable about how to provide effective support; instead, they build knowledge and understanding through experience. Having a 'sanctuary' within school and an adult to advocate on their behalf is cited as a potentially supportive strategy. Peer support and peer education are also thought to be of value; however, there are exceptions, making it important to listen to individual children about their perceived support needs. Implications for Educational Psychologist's practice and the limitations of this study are also discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.616638  DOI: Not available
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