Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.607198
Title: Psychology, behaviour, and the family environment in children with diagnoses of precocious pubertal development
Author: Clarkson, Emma Louise
ISNI:       0000 0004 5362 4714
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
The aim of the thesis was to identify whether children with a diagnosis of Premature Adrenarche (PA) or Central Precocious Puberty (CPP) presented with an atypical psychological profile in comparison to typically-developing children. A battery of psychometrics was constructed to study several domains, including eating behaviour, self-perception and intellectual ability. Measures of family environment and parental stress were also included. In addition, an interpretative phenomenological analysis was conducted on five interviews with parents to gain a greater insight into the experience of parenting a child with a diagnosis of early puberty. It was found that several differences between groups, such as weight gain, internalising behaviours and sleep problems, could be attributed to hormonal or behavioural changes typically associated with pubertal development across all groups. Other observations were specific to the pubertal disorders, such as risk of obesity, problem eating behaviours, anxiety and depression, and aggression. Furthermore, being from a family with a single-parent or non-parent care-giver, and increased family stress were related to earlier pubertal development. In summary, children with a diagnosis of PA or CPP may be more likely to display altered behaviour and psychopathology, but some of these difficulties may also occur in typical pubertal development.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.607198  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
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