Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.606946
Title: Immersive authoring for virtual reality
Author: Dunk, Andrew
Awarding Body: University of Reading
Current Institution: University of Reading
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
Virtual Reality (VR) is a powerful tool for visualising and interacting with information. VR is inherently 3D whereas the majority of VR authoring tools are 2D. Many of the resources we use to judge 3D form and appearance, like stereopsis, focus and judgement with respect to one's own body, are not available to us when using 2D technology. While 2D solutions usually provide a reasonable representation of 3D, what looks plausible in 2D can be incorrect or impossible to achieve when studied in 3D; an example of this is artwork by Escher. Additionally, the amount of effort and expertise required to create useful Virtual Environments (VEs) limits the use of the technology to small and specific user groups. Research is held back because of these limitations. Although VR provides potential solutions to current issues in research, visualising and interacting within complex data or performing repeatable experiences of an environment for different users for example; academics from other fields are not applying their research domain to this technology because of the cost, time and expertise required to use VR effectively. There is currently a skills bottleneck with VR technology. This thesis aims to alleviate this bottleneck and provide a springboard for other science by creating a usable immersive VE authoring tool named VRIDE. A literature survey confirmed this need and lack of such tools as well as the importance of UI/GUI and the need for and lack of software libraries capable of providing this functionality to programmers for creating immersive VR applications. Usability tests document participant's perception of their own mental and physical effort using VRIDE; task performance and behavioural analysis from videos are also reported. This data is compared to determine the overall performance of VRIDE. It is concluded that VRIDE and its associated 3DGUI development library provide a solid springboard for both novice and expert users wishing to use VR technology.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.606946  DOI: Not available
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