Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.604318
Title: A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work : including an investigation of counselling psychologists' experience of the role of body in the therapeutic encounter
Author: Kouloumbri, Maria
Awarding Body: University of Surrey
Current Institution: University of Surrey
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
Objective: The role and use of the body in psychotherapy has been influenced by a number of theoretical, cultural, philosophical and ethical factors. For example, psychoanalysis expresses concern in its potential use within the therapeutic relationship whilst the humanistic paradigm acknowledges the body as a channel for communication for both clients and therapists. However, in counselling psychology there is limited reference to the importance of the body in therapy. This study aims to enrich the literature by exploring counselling psychologists' experience of the role of the body and its meaning in clinical practice. Method: Semi structured interviews were conducted with 5 qualified counselling psychologists working in private practice. Data was analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Results: The results of the analysis revealed a number of themes. The participants acknowledged the significance of the use of the body, such as bodily techniques and touch as important tools in therapy. At the same time, they expressed mixed thoughts and considerations which they take into account when using such tools. Therapist's and client's characteristics, their personal relationship with their bodies and, the lack of reference to body-oriented theories in their training appeared to be influential factors on their perceptions of the body as well as how and when they use it in therapy. Conclusion: The results of this study highlight the need for counselling psychology to reconsider the place and meaning of the body in therapy and in training to encourage professionals towards a greater involvement with bodily aspects.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Psych.D) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.604318  DOI: Not available
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