Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.604290
Title: Measurement of mother's postnatal bonding in routine clinical practice
Author: Moran, Philippa
Awarding Body: University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
The aim of the study was to investigate the validity of postnatal bonding measures in routine clinical practice. Identifying mothers who are having difficulty with postnatal bonding provides the best opportunity to identify attachment problems early, so that intervention can be provided. Currently there are no established ways of measuring postnatal bonding routinely in clinical practice. This study aimed to address the validity of postnatal bonding measures by investigating their relationship with key theoretical constructs (adult attachment relationships, antenatal bonding, depression, social support and Health Visitors' assessment of need). Thirty-eight women were recruited antenatally. They completed questionnaires assessing antenatal attachment, depression symptomology, adult attachment relationships and social support. These participants were followed up after the birth of their baby (mean 16 days old) when they completed further questionnaires assessing postnatal bonding (Mother-ta-Infant Bonding Scale, MIBS; Neonatal Perception Inventory, NPI) and depression. Health Visitors also completed a questionnaire about their assessment of need decisions. Results showed that postnatal bonding measures were related to adult attachment relationships with a participants' mother and partner, and antenatal depression. There were no significant relationships between postnatal bonding measures and the other correlates measured.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psychol.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.604290  DOI: Not available
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