Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.604238
Title: The role of stimulus-response bindings in priming : multiple routes and multiple stages
Author: Horner, A. J.
Awarding Body: University of Cambridge
Current Institution: University of Cambridge
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
Priming and repetition suppression (RS) are often thought to reflect the facilitation of psychological (component) processes engaged during initial and subsequent presentations of a stimulus. These phenomena however can also reflect the formation of direct, stimulus-response (S-R) bindings, retrieval of which can bypass many of the processes engaged during the initial presentation. This thesis presents evidence that S-R learning contributions dominate in long-lag repetition priming of semantic classification of visual stimuli. Furthermore, S-R bindings can form at multiple levels of both stimulus and response representation, suggesting S-R learning is a highly flexible process. Whereas RS, as measured by fMRI, is sensitive to the retrieval of S-R bindings in inferior prefrontal regions, it is shown to be insensitive to such retrieval in posterior ventral visual regions. Using sensor-level analyses of EEG, repetition effects that are sensitive to the retrieval of S-R bindings are time-locked to response-onset whereas repetition effects that are unaffected by such retrieval are time-locked to stimulus-onset. As such, both fMRI and EEG point to a dissociation between possible S-R learning and component process contributions to priming and RS. Finally, the formation of S-R bindings is shown to be dependent upon attention, with no significant S-R learning effects present for stimuli either unattended at initial or subsequent presentation. Given dominant theories of repetition priming are incapable of incorporating many of these results, a multiple-route multiple-stage (MR-MS) framework is proposed. This framework attempts to incorporate known component process contributions to priming and RS with the S-R learning contributions presented in this thesis.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.604238  DOI: Not available
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