Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.604234
Title: Biostratigraphy and palaeolimnology of Late-glacial and Holocene lake marls at Quidenham Mere, Norfolk
Author: Horne, D. C.
Awarding Body: University of Cambridge
Current Institution: University of Cambridge
Date of Award: 2000
Availability of Full Text:
Full text unavailable from EThOS.
Please contact the current institution’s library for further details.
Abstract:
In southern Britain there are relatively few natural lakes that have records extending back to the beginning of the Late-glacial. The exceptions are the Meres of central East Anglia that are infilled with organic sediments, providing detailed vegetational records. Of these, Quidenham Mere is unique because its sedimentary infill is composed largely of lake marls. These contain abundant molluscs and ostracods, as well as beautifully preserved pollen, covering most of the Late-glacial and Holocene. At Quidenham Mere, substantial thicknesses of sediment (c. 12m) have accumulated relatively rapidly (at times 0.8 cm yr-1), which has enabled detailed palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. The history of the Mere has been reconstructed using a range of fossils, including molluscs, ostracods, pollen and Chara remains. A multiple profile approach utilising three cores, one from the centre and two from the lake margin, has allowed a more comprehensive reconstruction, than if a single profile had been used on its own. This approach was adopted because although Central cores are likely to yield continuous sedimentary records, they will not necessarily reflect the lake-level fluctuations that can be so obvious in marginal sequences, where the frequency of shells is invariably higher. The use of geochemical proxies (e.g. stable isotopes and trace elements) of ostracod, mollusc and bulk carbonate have also contributed to a more meaningful understanding of the palaeolimnology of the Mere. The poor correlation (r < 0.7) between the δ18O and δ13C values indicate that the Mere has been hydrologically open throughout its history.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.604234  DOI: Not available
Share: