Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.603573
Title: Investigating the effects of Elaborative Rehearsal Vocabulary Learning Strategy (ERVLS) on vocabulary learning for EFL learners in Taiwan
Author: Yeh , Shao-Mou
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
Vocabulary learning is crucial to second language acquisition. However, as far as EFL (English as Foreign Language) learners are concerned, the process of vocabulary learning is often distinguished as tedious and laborious. This study explored the effects of Elaborative Rehearsal Vocabulary Learning. Strategy (ERVLS) on vocabulary learning in a science and technology university in the Taoyuan County area in Taiwan. Students participating in this study were Y(year university EFL. Chinese students who were taking English courses in the Department of Applied Foreign Languages in a university of science and technology in the Taoyuan County area in Northern Taiwan, ROC. Four classes of similar proficiency levels were conveniently chosen as samples making a grand total of 196 students assigned into two groups: the control group (CG), 94 students, and the experimental group (EG), 102 students. All participants shared a similar social and educational background. During the 16-week experimental time, the teacher taught the control group under the grammar translation rote memory vocabulary teaching method while the experimental group was instructed under the ERVLS. SPSS version 19 was used for data analysis. Additionally, in order to gain information about use and effects of the newly learned ERVLS , a qualitative interview on 19 students and 11 teachers was carried out. It concluded that ERVLS has an overall effect on students' vocabulary acquisition. Further research and implications for future vocabulary learning and teaching were recommended and suggested.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.603573  DOI: Not available
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