Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.603392
Title: Power delivery mechanisms for asynchronous loads in energy harvesting systems
Author: Zhang, Xuefu
Awarding Body: University of Newcastle Upon Tyne
Current Institution: University of Newcastle upon Tyne
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
For systems depending on methods, a fundamental contradiction in the power delivery chain has existed between conventional to supply it. DC/DC conversion (e.g.) has therefore been an integral part of such systems to resolve this contradiction. be made tolerant to a much wider range of Vdd variance. This may open up opportunities for much more energy efficient methods of power delivery. performance of different power delivery mechanisms driving both asynchronous and synchronous loads directly from a harvester source bypassing bulky energy method, which employs a energy from a EH circuit depending on load and source conditions, is developed. through comprehensive comparative analysis. Based on the novel CBB power delivery method, an asynchronous controller is circuits to work with tasks. The successful asynchronous control design drives a case study that is meant to explore relations between power path and task path. To deal with different tasks with variable harvested power, systems may have a range of operation conditions and thus dynamically call for CBB or SCC type power set of capacitors to form CBB or SCC is implemented with economic system size. This work presents an unconventional way of designing a compact-size, quick- circuit overcome large voltage variation in EH systems and implement smart power management for harsh EH environment. The power delivery mechanisms (SCC) employed to help asynchronous- logic-based chip testing and micro-scale EH system demonstrations.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.603392  DOI: Not available
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