Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.601138
Title: How is good governance re-contextualised at the local level in Indonesia?
Author: Choi, Ina
Awarding Body: University of Bristol
Current Institution: University of Bristol
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
Drawing upon a theoretical framework that sees the post.Washington Consensus (PWC) as inclusive neoliberalism, this thesis suggests an alternative way of analysing the impact of neoliberalism in Indonesia, focusing on new patterns of elite capture influenced by the PWc. A considerable body of literature on contemporary Indonesia argues that neoliberalism has had minimal influence due to the failure to build a regulatory state. Yet, what is often missed out in this kind of analysis is recognition that neoliberalism has wider political and social consequences. Against this backdrop, this thesis extends the analysis of neoliberalism in Indonesia to look at how the depoiiticisation of participation, encouraged by the PWC, has unfolded in Indonesia. Through a case study of local governance refonns in three districts, the thesis reveals how the World Bank's inclusive governance agenda - aimed at constraining civil society actors and the poor so they do not interfere with the market economy - has been appropriated by Indonesian elites to suit their interests. It is argued that elites ' adoption of inclusive governance has served to discipline civil society so that increased public participation in the refonnation era does not pose a significant challenge to existing power relations. In addition to providing insights into how the PWC's inclusive neoliberalism is 'localised', generating hybrid outcomes, the analysis developed in the thesis also sheds light on new patterns of elite capture of Indonesia's democratisation processes. While a sizeable body of literature focuses on elites' manipulation of electoral processes in undennining Indonesia's democracy, the thesis highlights that elite's selective embracing of the PWC also plays a part in circumscribing meaningful civil society participation.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.601138  DOI: Not available
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