Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.599819
Title: In vitro cellular responses to phosphorylcholine-based polymers
Author: Habib, M.
Awarding Body: University of Cambridge
Current Institution: University of Cambridge
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
In this study the biocompatibility of PC polymers modified with various amounts of cationic charge was investigated. Three PC polymers, PC20, PC5 and PC0, containing 20%, 5% and 0% cationic charge were used. The response of primary human endothelial, osteoblast (HOB) and mononuclear cells to PC-coated surfaces was investigated using a range of in vitro techniques. All three cell types adhered to PC surfaces in both serum-supplemented and serum­-free media. However increased cell adhesion was observed in the presence of serum. Similarly cell adhesion increased with the presence of cationic charge in the polymer. The cationic charge also induced specific morphologies in each cell type. Endothelial cells were noted to require serum for their maximal spreading on PC-coated surface. The adhesion of endothelial cells was also found to increase with pre-coating of PC surfaces with fibronectin. HOB cell did not show an inflammatory response to PC surface, while mononuclear and endothelial cells did. However no differences were noted in the inflammatory response of endothelial cells to PC polymers in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide. HOB cells’ proliferation was greater on PC20 compared to PC5 and tissue culture plastic. Enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase as well as its messenger RNA levels was higher on PC24 than PC5 and tissue culture plastic. HOB cells also formed nodules on PC20 but not on PC5, suggesting that 20%o cationic charge may be optimal for HOB cell differentiation. These findings have extended an understanding of bioeompalibility of PC polymers and ultimately could expand their clinical applications.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.599819  DOI: Not available
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