Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.599301
Title: Functionalised single-walled carbon nanotubes for biomedical application
Author: Gao, H.
Awarding Body: University of Cambridge
Current Institution: University of Cambridge
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
This thesis details the synthesis of water-soluble functionalised SWNTs (F-SWNTs) and evaluation of F-SWNTs as drug delivery nanovehicles. Carboxylic acid groups were introduced to the SWNTs by sonicating SWNTs in concentrated sulphuric/nitric acids. A series of Jeffamine polymers (polyoxyalkyleneamines) and two modified polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, PEG-lys 5000 and diamino-PEG 4000, were conjugated to the acid-sonicated SWNTs via carbodiimide-mediated coupling, to give a series of F-SWNT products with high water solubility. Cytotoxicity of the F-SWNT products towards HeLa and CHO cells was assessed and the F-SWNTs were shown to be well tolerated by the cells, as evidenced by MTT assay and LDH assay. The blood compatibility of F-SWNTs was assessed with an erythrolysis assay and cellular uptake of fluorescein-labelled F-SWNTs was determined by flow cytometry. Confocal microscopy was used to investigate the intra cellular trafficking of the F-SWNTs following uptake and indicated that the F-SWNTs entered cells within 24 hours of incubation, but did not enter the cell nuclei even after 48 hours of incubation. The ability of soluble SWNTs to deliver Doxorubicin, an anti-cancer anthracycline, hydrophobically associated to the F-SWNTs, into cells was investigated. The cytotoxicity of the doxorubicin-SWNTs (D-SWNTs) was compared to free doxorubicin and unmodified F-SWNTs and it was shown that whilst D-SWNTs were able to deliver doxorubicin into cells quickly, D-SWNT was less toxic than free doxorubicin at an equivalent concentration. The implication of these observations for drug delivery applications are discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.599301  DOI: Not available
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