Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.599248
Title: Design, modelling and fabrication of a microbattery
Author: Fu, L.
Awarding Body: University of Cambridge
Current Institution: University of Cambridge
Date of Award: 2008
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Abstract:
Power source supplies energy for a given application. It is one of the most important factors for the successful design of an engineering application. However, no systematic selection method is available for the selection of power sources. In the first part of this thesis, a rational method based on matching the physical and performance characteristics of power sources to the requirements of the given task is developed. Using power source database and performance characteristics charts, the method is described and demonstrated with a case study. To date, the development of micro-power sources is still at an early stage. It has become one of the great constraints for the autonomous microsystems. In this thesis, an innovative design of a zinc-air microbattery is presented. The proposed structure of the microbattery contains a 3D electrode with a high density of zinc posts that will provide high porosity and reaction area. The simplified cell construction and improved features of the proposed microbattery make it suitable for easy fabrication, and general and practical use in microsystems. A model for the microbattery is built and the internal behaviours and performance predictions are computer-simulated with MatLab. The fabrication process for the microbattery is developed and improved. The electrical test shows that the microbatteries fabricated have a high current output density as predicted, and the output performance of the microbattery is in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction by modelling. This study has demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed zinc-air microbattery that is suitable for the applications in autonomous microsystems.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.599248  DOI: Not available
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